Tag: music

“Release Plans”

I spent yester-eve with (bro) Hamish and our mix-engineer Matt Caradus making final moves on the soon-to-be released ‘Black Boy Peaches’ album.

It’s nice to be able to execute a “release plan” (lol) while actually being on deadline, unlike the last time (in the dark-ages of 2010) when we missed the Company Feel Good release-date by over a month!

Anyhow, as good as this is… I may as well say that the concept of planning is dubious, at best. The future is so unpredictably filled with twists and turns that pretending to hold the reigns is a little on the naive side. Typing up a nice looking release hit-list is comforting, sure, and it does help by giving some practical goals to hit. But it is just a one-dimensional view of what is in reality a kaleidoscopic-future, and it is guaranteed not to work as anticipated. If you’ve ever planned anything that involves other people in the slightest (i.e. almost everything ever), you’ll know what it’s like to have missed emails, inconclusive phone calls, and a lack of interest in what you are trying to achieve!

The plan looks great until on the first day when somebody says No!

So, our album release is more to do with intent than planning. Our goal is obviously to give our precious album that we have loved and laboured over as much a chance of filling the airwaves as possible; so, for what it’s worth, we will plan and do everything within our capacity to aid that. But rather than trying to force a narrow, single-lane vision of the future into existence, our release preparation will be focused on a) remaining open to possibilities, b) finding and connecting with people with whom we find resonance, and c) enjoying the mystery of life and the anticipation of new music.

Well, enough with the positive self-talk, better go and finish my release plan!

Diminished Chords

I never understood the purpose of diminished chords.

[A diminished chord that appears naturally within a major scale is that which starts in the 7th position of the scale. The chord is completed with two minor-3rd intervals on top (an interval which is 3-half steps up the scale). In C Major, this would be a chord with the notes B – D – F. To contrast this with major and minor chords, B minor == B – D – F# : B major == B – D# – F#.]

Major and minor, these are easy enough. You can play them together, and they sound good. There’s heaps of combinations. But a diminished chord, … ugh. Well, I have just blocked it out as a possible option whenever I’ve been playing.

But! But now I understand. When practising arpeggios up and down through a key (eg. F#, G#m, A#m, B, C#, D#m, Fdim … F#) I found that, yes, there is a musical place for diminished chords. In context, moving slowly and musically through various note-patterns, and (importantly) resolving from the diminished to the home chord, I had my aha moment. It actually sounded nice!

The strange and untenable has its place in a diverse environment where there is movement, (melodic) distinction and resolution.

Enjoy the tension… just keep it moving!

Just Enough

‘Just enough’ is the place of neither too little nor too much.

In music, the place of ‘just enough’ might be something like this: just enough technique to execute and contribute artistically and just enough disciplined practise to be natural. It might be just enough study to be aware of the the depths without becoming lost in them. It might be using the skill/technique/ability that you have just enough of to become a part of a group, to contribute, to add flavour.

‘Just enough’ sits between the other two places: too much and too little. How do we know what is too much and what is too little, and find the sweet spot of just enough?

The essence of creativity is limitation and boundary. So, too much is a curse, an enemy of creative action. If we are stuck exploring endless possibility, we get none of the opposite – certainty. We need some level of certainty to begin.

But too little is a curse as well. If we don’t explore widely we fail to stretch, stagnating from lack of challenge, and missing chances to connect (seemingly) disconnected things.

With just enough comes contentment. Alongside just enough stand clarity and understanding. While learning and living just enough is like walking a tightrope, it may well be the ultimate and fulfilling balancing act.